Sea Radish

Sea Radish
Sea Radish

I thought we should take a walk on the wild side in our Flower a Day posting, with this wild Sea Radish scene from last summer. These were growing on the verge and were so impressive in their numbers, that, though tiny they easily captured my attention. I don’t usually have the same colour featured in subsequent posts, but with the rather gloomy weather we’ve had lately, I wanted more sunshine, so here they are for us all. I hope in their airy carefree abandonment they might make our day feel a little lighter. With them I send a warm hug to all.
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6 Responses

  1. It is a bright colour and Lovely burst of sunshine. Were they close to the shore and this the name. Hugs to you.

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    1. Thanks Linda. No, these were by the skating rink in Canning! Although technically we are not that far from the shore, I guess. I’m glad you like it.

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  2. This plant evokes another suppressed interest of mine (spurred by my father’s) of wild edibles. Unlike the wild carrot family (remember Queen Anne’s Lace) whose members are mostly poisonous and therefore not edible, wild radish is a member of the cabbage family whose members are mostly edible. This particular version seems to be without leaves but I think you want to include those in your salad too, along with the rays of sunshine the blooms give. Nature at its best – simple floral forms with tasty offerings as a treat. Doesn’t get much better than that in my book. Thank you, Ellie.

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    1. Thanks for recognising the hidden heroes in the plant world, Janet! They may not have the flamboyant beauty so admired by all, but when you want something to eat, beauty is not the main criteria. And does it lack beauty anyway? Not a bit! It just takes a discerning eye (and palate) to appreciate it. I have begun myself to recognise the brassica family’s many members and have a new appreciation for all of them. Did you know that if you are eating cooked brassicas, in order to make the sulfarophane, a handy cancer fighting compound available, either chop it up well in advance, or just add a little of the raw cruciferous family to the cooked vegetable – even a pinch of mustard powder will do it! Info here: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/second-strategy-to-cooking-broccoli/
      Thanks again!

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  3. Didn’t really go for the Wild Sea Radish …. but the warm hug went over well … Raining here too and we have had a virus alert because of ONE case and so they locked down most of the city … ridiculous . Gym closed and my bowls for Saturday and Sunday cancelled .. need some flower power for sure .. cheers

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    1. Thanks Len. Not every flower will be a favourite of everyone, that’s for sure, I understand.
      Sorry to hear about the outbreak. 1 will lead to more, so better safe than sorry while it’s easy to contain. But it’s too bad about the bowls. Get your own gym at home! 😉 Take care. More hugs.

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