Purple Dead-Nettle

Purple dead-nettle
Purple dead-nettle

This flower is appearing everywhere at the moment and I now know why. Although it originated in Europe and Asia, it flourishes just about anywhere, even becoming invasive. You can perhaps see from the leaves that it is a member of the mint family and in fact it is an edible plant, though I confess that I have only found that out on researching this just now. Apparently it makes a great tea or tincture to help with seasonal allergies and also makes an excellent ‘spit poultice’ to deal with insect bites or small wounds. (If you don’t know what that is, look it up, but it is pretty much what you would think from the name.) It is also anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory, so it can be made into a good salve for aches and pains and first aid. I wouldn’t just go out and eat it or make a tincture and take it after reading my post as it can affect some people (pregnant or nursing for example) so do your research before trying to use this in those various ways. This post is about the tiny sweet flower, after all, not a medical advice column! After learning all this, however, I have a new respect for this plant. Enjoy your day everyone, whatever you are doing. A Flower a Day #233

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6 Responses

  1. Fascinating, and surely deserving of a nicer name than dead-nettle, which sounds neither appetizing nor medicinal. I shall certainly keep my eyes peeled for these interesting botanicals when I’m next out on my forest or meadow walks. However, I shall think of them as ‘purple delectables’, in order to honour and remember their substantial curricula vitae. Happy foraging I will go. Thank you. Ellie.

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    1. I thought the same of the name Janet, so I approve of your renaming in that fashion. I had a little taste yesterday, but the leaves are a little hairy. I hope you find some, they are everywhere here now. Thanks as always Janet.

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  2. You caught the focus beautifully on this Ellie. I had no idea about all the info you shared – thank you. We have a profusion of this plant too this year. I thought it was because we had disturbed so much of our earth last year during our redesign. Or maybe I have only just begun to look at it in more detail.

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    1. It’s amazing what I have found now that I have focus (see what I did there) and purpose in this project. And thank you for the lovely comment, Diana. Let me know if you decide to use it in some way.

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  3. Thank you very much for the flower and all the information. I will have to go out and have a look for it. We do have a lovely sunny day today so that will make it even more encouraging to go out. Hope you have a great day sending along a hug to you and Steve.

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    1. It’s my pleasure, Linda – both the discovery and the sharing of this plant and the information. I’m sure you will find plenty around, now you know what you are looking for. Your garden is full of wonderful plants. We both thank for the hugs. And I for the comment.

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